Blogprojekt: Studieren Weltweit

Ab sofort schreibe ich für den Blog Studieren Weltweit über mein ERASMUS-Jahr und mein Auslandsstudium in Galway. Meinen ersten Blogbeitrag „Blind im Ausland Studieren – Geht das?“ findet ihr hier. Unter dem Hashtag #ErlebeEs könnt ihr mir und den anderen Korrespondenten außerdem auf Facebook, Twitter und Instagram folgen.


Review: „The Wake“ by Tom Murphy with Audio Description at The Abbey Theatre

Photo Narrations

A few weeks ago we travelled to Dublin to see the latest production by the Abbey Theatreof Tom Murphy’s “The Wake”, a play portraying the materialism of Irish small-town communities in the early 1990s. It reveals how far most members of so called respectable families are prepared to go to satisfy their desire for power and wealth.

Accessible Performances

So far 2016 was a great year for fans of audio described theatre performances and I hope the continuing international interest in Irish arts will further not only creative art production, but also help to increase the availability of caption and audio description for patrons with visual and hearing impairments. I have written about how audio description works and the importance of making culture and arts accessible to everyone in a previous review.

The staff of the Abbey Theatre is very friendly and the lady who hands out…

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Mixer on the Salthill Promenade

Hound Dog Tales: Mixer the Trouble Maker

I came second with this story in the Hounddog Tails competition in the over 18 category. The short story competition was kindly organised by the owners of Hounddog Dog Grooming in Galway. By the way, I highly recommend them: They do an excellent job, are lovely to owners and dogs, and they always have time for a chat about walking routes and grooming tips. The competition categories were under 12, 12 to 18 and over 18. Thus, there was a great mix of people at the awards ceremony and of course doggies of all shapes and sizes. The first place winners received three free dog grooms, second and third place one and we even got trophies. The best part however is that three dogs from the MADRA rescue centre get groomed for free every month in the name of the first prize winners. The people I talked to all own rescue dogs, so there is absolutely no need to support scrupulous puppy farmers. It was inspiring to meet so many people who truly care about dogs. Plus, I would never have written the following story without a prompt. So here it is:

Mixer the Trouble Maker

As a child I’ve always wanted a dog, but we lived in an apartment and my mum said it wouldn’t be fair. Instead, I got guinea pigs. They lived to ten and I loved them, but they wouldn’t walk on a lead. They just hopped in circles around me and I had to defend them from real dogs.

When I moved from Germany to Galway, I suddenly had a big garden and the Salthill promenade right outside the door. After almost refusing to give a dog back after two weeks minding, I decided to finally get one myself. One day I turned up at the GSPCA shelter and when asked what kind of dog I was thinking about I gave the very precise answer:

“I don’t know, medium energy terrier-something, that can be on it’s own for a few hours perhaps?”

Assuming small dogs are less work than bigger ones is a typical first-time owner misconception.

“What about a Jack Russell than?”

“Oh yes, a Jack Russell, my best friend’s parents have three and they are one of three breeds I would recognise.”

Mixer and I
Mixer the day he chose me.

Needless to say, I fell in love with the first dog I was shown. A Jack Russell called Mixer. He rolled over to let me tickle his tummy for a while, than got up and walked confidently away. They called him Mixer because he used to sleep under a concrete mixer until the lads on the building site built him a shelter. They fed him until they were finished at the site and he had to go to the rescue shelter. I thought about renaming him, but the name fits. Having lived on scraps, he’s definitely not picky. In fact he eats absolutely everything. Like a giant food mixer he devours everything often without even chewing it. I still can’t leave him alone with food. On our second day together, the cheeky monkey stole a banana out of the fruit basket. Since I have Mixer, the floor is definitely clean, apart from mucky paw prints and hair.

Mixer and his plastic banana

It’s a bit like I imagine it to be to have children. In a way having children should be easier, because you can bring them everywhere without having to tie them outside and they wear nappies and have no teeth in the beginning. Ok, that’s a silly comparison, but like first-time baby parents, I wanted to do everything right as a first-time doggie mum. I spent hours looking at the ingredients of dog food, reading toy reviews to find out which ones last longest and contain no toxic materials, and browsing training tips websites. I even broke my vegetarian existence, because I tried a piece of kibble I can’t quite remember what meat tastes like, but if it’s all like this, I’m not missing much. Well, Mixer obviously likes it.

I heard somewhere small dogs often have dental issues. Have you ever tried to brush a dog’s teeth? Reflexively I opened my own mouth and started dribbling, while Mixer licked the dog-toothpaste, bit the brush and spat at me. The dog dental care set is made in Germany and I thought we export mainly cars and beer.

Mixer trying to climb a stone fence
Mixer trying to climb a fence

Mixer is an escape artist. Geraldine who did the home check showed me some gaps I had to fix and I blocked them off with concrete blocks, thinking he’s no bank robber so why would he dig a tunnel. However, after all the blocking and several roles of wire later, he still finds gaps. He digs, jumps, climbs and balances on walls. There must be a bit of a cat in him, maybe he is a “Cat-Russell”. You would imagine someone from the former DDR should be good at building walls, but every time I’m convinced that he won’t find another one, he disappears for another adventure, only to loiter back into the garden after a while, as if nothing has happened. Now I’ve ordered an electric fence. This is war!

The only positive thing about Mixer’s rambles is that I got to know most of the neighbours. The most embarrassing incident was when he sneaked into a house, ate the resident dog’s food and left a smelly surprise.  Thankfully the neighbours still talk to me.

Sometimes, because I’m visually impaired people ask me why I didn’t get a guide dog, but I wanted to find out whether I’m a doggy person first. One day a lady asked me, if Mixer was a guide-dog. I thought it was a joke and replied: “Of course, he is still learning,” all the while having to hold onto the lead with both hands to stop him from chasing a cat. However, she was serious and while walking away mumbled: “Well he still needs some training, but at least he takes up less space than a Labrador.”


I would never go hungry with Mixer, if allowed to lead he would navigate me to wherever he smells food, but it could be a bin instead of a restaurant.

Mixer definitely changed my life for the better. I bring him for a run on the beach everyday. Sometimes the place is like a canine playground. Mixer is the kid – I mean dog – nobody wants to play with, because he’s not really interested in making friends, all he does is bully bigger dogs and runs off with their toys. If they are squeaky toys, I’m in trouble, because he loves them but never gets them because they are killed within minutes.

I got to know some lovely people. For some reason, I tend to remember the dogs’ names better than their owners’. One night a man even gave me a reflecting collar with flashlights, just because I remarked that it is a brilliant idea. Walking Mixer also raised my awareness of the environment. It’s only since I have to stop him from picking up every bit of rubbish along the way that I’ve realised how littered the streets actually are.

We even bring Mixer cycling in a basket on the tandem bike, but I much prefers running alongside the bike.

Having a dog is certainly a big commitment, time – and moneywise. However, I already miss Mixer when I’m just gone for a weekend. It’s nice to come home to a furry friend with a wagging tale, although he’s probably only happy because it’s dinner time again. There he is, five past six and he sits here staring accusingly at me. So, I better give him his dinner.

Hounddog Dog Grooming:





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Review: CARE by WillFredd Theatre with Audio Description

Photo Narrations

Although the number of audio described and subtitled live-performances has considerably increased over the last few years, they are still rare outside Dublin. Consequently, I was delighted when I received the Arts & Disability Ireland text newsletter notifying subscribers that WillFredd Theatre Companywas to bring its newest production CARE to the Galway Town Hall Theatre.The show featured audio description for visually impaired audience members and subtitles for patrons with hearing impairments.

What is Audio Description?

People may know Audio description (AD) from TV programmes. It is a voiceover telling blind and visually impaired viewers, or indeed anyone who chooses to use it, information that is not conveyed through dialogue, music or sound. For example It would say something like: “John enters holding a folder under his arm. He is a well-dressed man in his forties.” I’m not familiar with the production side of AD, but it is…

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Galway 2020: Tina Paulick –Germany

This post was first published as part of the New Tribes Series in the Galway2020 blog. Galway is bidding to become the European Capital of Culture 2020 and with only a few weeks left until the judges make their final decision, I want to share this again. I volunteer for the Galway2020 initiative and the Galway2020 team is very open to suggestions. They made me feel welcome and try to find volunteer roles I’m able to do and enjoy. Sometimes people with a disability are, often unintentionally, excluded from participating in and contributing to mainstream cultural projects. In fact, their voices are seldom heard outside disability related contexts. For me this wasn’t the case in the Galway2020 campaign. Thanks for letting me be part of it. I hope we win!

I like the concept of Europe, because theoretically, it means I can be German and Irish at the same time.

I wearing the Galway2020 shirt at the docks.

My Origins

I’m from Germany and I came to Galway as an ERASMUS student while studying English at the University of Leipzig. My degree focused mainly on Britain, but I wanted to go somewhere different and Galway was advertised as a small seaside town, so I picked it without knowing much about it.

I’m legally blind and there aren’t that many students with a disability who go abroad. I had to organise some things in advance, but it was definitely worth it, because I became more self-confident and independent. I’d recommend living in another country to anyone, but I’d especially encourage students with a disability to give it a go. During my first week in town, I did a walking tour and the guide said, ‘Some people call Galway the graveyard of ambitions, because once you move here, you can’t or won’t leave again’. I’m now doing an M.A. in Irish Studies at NUIG, so I agree with the part about not wanting to leave, but I don’t think Galway is a graveyard of ambitions. It’s very much alive and I can imagine living and working here for a while longer.

My Irish friends are always amazed that I don’t greet everyone I hear speaking German on the street, which is what most of them would do. To be honest, I didn’t really go looking for other Germans; I wanted to meet people from different countries. However, I met some lovely Germans over here, mostly ERASMUS students and people connected to the German Department in NUIG. Native speakers of English are said to be unwilling to learn another language, but I know lots of people here who learn German or at least have some phrases. There’s a German conversation group meeting every other Tuesday in the Bierhaus, if anyone wants to catch up on their German. Living abroad definitely made me look at my home country and culture in a different way.

Being at Home

If you go out and do things, it’s very easy to meet people and to get involved with community groups and projects. In the beginning, college clubs and societies helped me a lot. Especially when you’re new somewhere and know nobody, you’re more prepared to try new things.

I joined the Galway Visually Impaired Activity Club. Every other Sunday, we go cycling on tandem bikes, with a sighted pilot in the front and a visually impaired person in the back. It’s a great way to get to know different people and it doesn’t matter whether you have a disability or not. Once or twice a year, we go on weekend trips and I already got to see a good bit of Ireland by bike. We also participate in charity cycles. The longest one I did was 100km, but our Sunday spins are shorter and we try to cater for all ages and abilities.

Last year, I helped organising a cycle from Berlin to Prague for the club and I hope to do the Cycle Against Suicide next year. I also volunteer with the NCBI (National Council for the Blind of Ireland), advising people on how to use their smart phones with the built-in accessibility features.

I’d love Galway to become more accessible to people with disabilities; more pedestrian crossings and acoustic lights, wheelchair accessible businesses and bigger street signs with contrasts.

There’s always something going on in Galway; festivals, good live music in pubs, charity events, and Connemara is ideal for all kinds of outdoor activities. I bring my Jack Russell terrier, Mixer, who I got from the GSPCA for a walk on the prom every day. It’s a great place to meet other doggie-people. I got so used to having the sea right outside my doorstep that I start missing it when I’m gone for more than a week.

When I first came here, I tried to listen to a conversation on the bus from Dublin airport and thought my English was really bad, because I couldn’t understand anything. It took me a while to realise that they spoke Irish. I’ve learned a few phrases from friends and Duolingo. People are delighted that I try, even when I get it wrong. I hope to do a spoken Irish course next year. I went to a few events in Irish and even though I didn’t understand most of it, it was fun.

Because of my visual impairment, I often have to ask for directions. People here are very nice, sometimes even a bit too helpful, when they want to help me cross a road which I don’t want to cross at all or try to lift me into a bus. But they mean well and sometimes, I have great conversations with total strangers.


I’d love Galway to become more accessible to people with disabilities; more pedestrian crossings and acoustic lights, wheelchair accessible businesses and bigger street signs with contrasts, to name only a few things. I recently wrote a blog post on how giving each bus stop an individual name and announcements on busses would improve Galway’s public transport system, not only to visually impaired users but also to visitors.

What it Means to be European

I like the concept of Europe, because theoretically, it means I can be German and Irish at the same time. It would be great if Europeans didn’t need to decide a citizen of which country they want to be, but I suppose that wouldn’t work for legal reasons. I find applying for anything in Ireland rather cumbersome. It’s all so bureaucratic. If you have documents in a language other than English, you have a real hard time. But I suppose that’s the same in every country. It would be great if it became easier to resettle within Europe, especially when it comes to insurance and state benefits.

First published:








Review: „Sisters of the Rising“ by Christiane O’Mahony at the Galway Theatre Festival

The two sisters on stage. Copyright Enrique Carnicero

One hundred years after the Easter Rising historians, the media and artists are exploring the Easter event not only from the perspectives of the executed leaders, but try to represent the experiences of the wider Irish society, including women and children. This one-act play follows two sisters who in their own way fought in the rising.

Although, this two-woman-and-a-harp play did not tell me anything new about the failed rebellion with regards to historical facts; it is an entertaining and engaging performance mixing fact and fiction. So far it is the only commemoration adaptation that captured my attention from start to finish.

The two little girls playing Joan of Arc and Queen Méabh made me smile; their teenage sibling rivalries turned them from fictional characters from the past into real people; and even when they finally get into the GPO, where they are initially only allowed to make sandwiches, their gossipy banter and flirtations sometimes lets the audience and the characters themselves for a moment forget that they are in the middle of a war and not at a pyjama party. Comic dialogues and poetry-like monologues together with extracts of a traditional Irish song, accompanied by an on-stage harp, lighten the play up and emphasise the tragedy befalling the family at the same time.

The plain stage setting and costume suits the play, since the hauntingly beautiful girlish voices and the harp which is also used for various sound effects carry the storyline. Other character’s speeches are indicated by both actresses saying their lines together and although it sometimes took them a second to get synchronised, it worked for me.

The O’Farrell sisters Josephine and Gillian are fictional, but their surname pays tribute to Elizabeth O’Farrell, the woman who delivered the surrender note and was subsequently cut out of all pictures depicting this historic defeat. Until recently apart from Constance Markievicz,  the contributions of women who fed and hid the rebels and worked as couriers had not been acknowledged. In an interview playwright and actress Christiane Mahony said she based her fictional account on witnesses statements of real women. Thus giving them a voice and remembering them.

The play starts in 1936 when Josie (played by O’Mahony herself) attends the state commemorations and discovers that her younger sister Gill’s name is omitted from the list of those who fought and died during the Rising. Angry and disillusioned Josie begins to tell her and her sister’s story, starting with their dreams and aspirations and their deceased father, who appeared to have lived more for the future republic than for his family and wanted his daughters to be “warrior queens”.

Josie: “I’m not a girl I’m a soldier!”

Gill: “Well you are a girl.”

Josie: “I’m a girl soldier, I have to get in”

Inspired by Constance Markvievitch and Maud Gonne, Josie is enthusiastic about the Irish language and wants to be a soldier. The completely apolitical Gill (played by Roseanne Lynch) on the other hand, has more modest and practical ambitions: She dreams of a beautiful wedding dress and having kids. However, the two sister’s personalities are more complex than it appears at first and as the audience follows them throughout Dublin delivering important messages to the various occupied buildings it becomes obvious that they need each other and that pure “male” strength is not all that is needed in a war.

“Sisters of the Rising” highlights once more the contributions and courage of the women who participated in the Easter Rising of 1916: All the kitchen-helpers, nurses and couriers, who defied conventional gender roles and often their parents’ orders and risked their reputation and their lives to fight for a cause they believed in.

“Women were perfect allies: Armed with charm and unsuspecting; with hiding places like petticoats to carry notes. The words of the leaders hidden in hairdos, puffed out up-dos, and pins. And tucked away in all that splendour a million military messages and that last one to surrender.”

One hundred years on, the contributions of the Irish women who participated in the Easter Rising are finally acknowledged and remembered and their descendents have – at least officially – the same duties and rights as Irishmen.

“Sisters of the Rising” runs for two more performances at the Nun’s Island Theatre as part of the Galway Theatre Festival:

  • May 1. 2pm
  • May 2. 2pm & 8.30 pm
  • Tickets €12 /€10
  • Duration 80 min. No interval


  • Cast: Christiane O’Mahony and Roseanne Lynch
  • Composer: John O’Brien
  • Director: Anushka Senanayake
  • Lighting and Set Designer: Brian Mitchell
  • Producer: Naomi Daly.


Photo copyright Enrique Carnicero


Access to Public Transport Outside Dublin

I moved from Germany to Galway to study at N.U.I.G. I am legally blind, but still have some sight. I’m not an Irish citizen and therefore don’t have the vote, but Ireland is my new home and I have to get on with my everyday life here. So here is my personal hobbyhorse ; public transport outside of Dublin:

I recently moved out of Galway city centre. Initially, I walked in and out to college, which took me half an hour each way. When the weather got really miserable my friends convinced me to try the bus. They checked the timetables and showed me the stops I needed. When I asked them what the stops were called, that’s when the difficulties started. The stops don’t have individual names and sometimes there is more than one stop on the same road.

Prepared with, to my mind, detailed descriptions of where exactly I wanted to get off, I started my adventure. Being used to big cities with buses, trams and trains running every 10 minutes, it took me a while to get used to waiting for a bus that is ten or more minutes late or doesn’t come at all, especially at stops without shelters.

Using the bus for the first few weeks was exasperating and I often went back to walking to preserve my peace of mind. In the beginning some bus drivers forgot to tell me where to get off and I only discovered it too late or ended up at the terminus. I suppose, I can’t really blame them, but sitting there wondering will he remember me or not, is not a pleasant sensation and I don’t want to ask every two minutes: “Is that it?”

Sometimes I recited my little verse about where I wanted to get off and the driver misunderstood me or asked “near this or that place” and I simply didn’t know. In extreme cases the driver didn’t even know the road I was talking about and asked other passengers, some of whom had contradictory opinions, one driver even consulted Google maps while driving. To be honest, that didn’t raise my confidence in the whole venture. My worst experience was when the bus let me off at a busy junction before the designated bus stop and I didn’t know where I was. I know it is convenient for some people to get off between stops, but I think it is dangerous, because drivers and cyclists don’t expect it.

I use the map on my IPhone to follow the route and go to the front when the integrated speech software announces the road .

Not only visually impaired people have problems with the lack of automatic announcements on buses. In summer, for tourists who don’t know where to get off, it is hard to direct them to the right place, because the stops don’t have individual names or numbers. There isn’t even a timetable on some of the stops. In fact anyone who is not familiar with Galway will find using public transport difficult. In my opinion this is something that should be addressed to improve Galway’s chances to become European Capital of Culture 2020.

I love Galway and I don’t want to move to Dublin, but I get jealous every time I’m using the capital’s much more efficient, faster and better organized public transport facilities.

The government tries to encourage people to avoid driving to work to decrease traffic jams, but they don’t seem to do much to promote using public transport or bikes.

In summary these are the main points I’m advocating for:

  1.  An individual name or number for each bus stop
  2. Automatic announcements and screen displays in all buses

 The cost of implementing measure 1. would be minimal and 2. would bring the service all over Ireland in line with that being provided in Dublin.

These measures are not only beneficial to people with disabilities, many of whom can not drive or cycle, but would also benefit the general public and tourists.


Tina’s photos for the exhibition in Canterbury Cathedral

Photo Narrations

All participants were asked to select 20 pictures we took during the photography workshop in Canterbury this July to be exhibited at Canterbury Cathedral. Personally, I found the selection process rather difficult and I had to go back to the pictures several times before making up my mind. I tried to choose photos that are not only nice to look at, but also have a story to tell. I hope the captions make some of them appear in a new light. I wrote about each individual day of the workshop in previous posts.

Day 1:

Moon over Canterbury

Moon over Canterbury

During the workshop we stayed in Turing College at the University of Kent. This picture was taken from the window of our room shortly after a rather crazy journey from Berlin to Canterbury. After 32°C, a bomb alarm at the airport and losing my ticket in the London underground, this peaceful…

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How do blind and visually impaired people go swimming?

This is a great post about how visually impaired and blind people can go swimming. Since I love swimming and Sandy’s View is a fantastic blog I have to share this with my readers. Additionally, I want to write more in English in the future, but I’ll keep my blog bilingual, so there will still be posts in German.

Das ist ein toller Post über Schwimmen für blinde und sehbehinderte, den ich umbedingt teilen muss. Ich habe dort ein Kommentar hinterlassen, das fast schon ein Blogbeitrag zu meinen eigenen Schwimmerfahrungen ist. Außerdem will ich in Zukunft ohnehin auch auf Englisch schreiben. Es wird trotzdem weiter Beiträge in Deutsch geben.

Sandy's View

After many discuntitledussions with my high school swimming teacher (and mustering up some courage), I finally decided to take swimming class during my senior year. It wasn’t that I thought I couldn’t swim because of my disability, but rather I had the same fear the average person has of sinking and drowning!! Being the only blind student in the class, I was unsure about how exactly I would keep up with my classmates. Luckily, my swimming teacher was very accommodating, and made sure my fears didn’t become a reality! She worked one-on-one with me and physically taught me how to do each movement before letting me practice on my own.

Like our sighted counterparts, blind and visually impaired individuals swim for pleasure, recreation and competition. There are many simple adaptations that allow us to enjoy this wonderful activity!

Some people wonder how those of us who are blind or…

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Tina über unser Fotoseminar am 9. Mai 2015

Bilder für die Blinden

Ich arbeite jetzt seit etwas mehr als einem Monat für „Bilder für die Blinden“ und habe um mich mit dem Projekt vertraut zu machen einige Bildbeschreibungen und Erfahrungsberichte zu vergangenen Workshops und Veranstaltungen gelesen. Vor ein paar Tagen habe ich unsere Vorschläge wie man Bilder für blinde Menschen beschreiben kann für unseren englischen Blog „Photo Narrations for the blind and sighted“ übersetzt und durch die intensive Beschäftigung mit dem Text kann ich ihn inzwischen fast auswendig. Aber das ist natürlich nicht mit der Teilnahme an einem Fotoseminar zu vergleichen und daher freute ich mich, vergangenen Samstag endlich selbst dabei sein zu können.

Trotz Bahnstreik schafften wir es rechtzeitig in der Alice Salomon Hochschule in Berlin zu sein. Auf dem Korridor hingen die Bilder aus dem Seminar im letzten Jahr. Im Großformat eingerahmt hinter Glas erweckten sie Ehrfurcht in mir und ich hoffte, dass in diesem Jahr ähnlich qualitative Bilder entstünden.

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