All posts by Tina Franziska Paulick

The Killers on stage, Source Wikipedia

The Killers Live at the RDS in Dublin – Accessibility Review

My boyfriend and I went to see The Killers with special guests Franz Ferdinand in the RDS Dublin last week. Both are fantastic live bands and the crowd got almost 4 hours of amazing live performance. We bought the tickets last winter and when I realised it was going to be an open air concert, I envisaged myself getting drenched. Fortunately the weather was fantastic 24°C, a heatwave as far as Irish summers go. This post is more about my experience attending the concert as a fan with vision impairment.  For a music review have a read of this excellent Hot Press article.

 

We got the DART to Sandymount where the crowd was directed out of the station by security staff. We used our canes and followed people to the venue. The RDS is a massive complex. I had been in the main arena for a graduate fair before, but never in the open air area. We are still able to see the security people in their high vis jackets, so we asked the first staff member we saw for assistance. A lady called Emma looked at our tickets and brought us to the right gate. We had to walk around the outside wall for over 10 minutes,, which is no problem but would have been difficult without assistance due to the crowds and the fact that we are unable to read the signs.We were allowed to skip the queue where the bags were searched. Emma told us about some of the concerts she gets to see and showed us a place near the back where we could stand.

 

We arrived early to hear Franz Ferdinand.  I know some of their songs and they are a great live band. We put our canes away and went a bit further into the crowd. People will probably not notice them anyway when it is packed and dancing along to the music with a cane looks a bit silly, unless you are trying to use it as a limbo stick. During the break we asked another staff member to guide us to the toilets. We walked to the main arena, thus avoiding the massive que outside the provided WC containers. Again, it would have been hard to find our way there and back without help.

 

“Somebody Told Me” live at RDS Dublin on YouTube

The Killers came on stage around 9. We stood somewhere in the middle and for the majority of the concert it was not too packed. We couldn’t really see anything on stage or the big screen, but a good band for me is mainly about the music. Some of the green light effects when it got dark were cool. The Journal .ie reported the next day, people found the concert really loud. I try to avoid loud noise and I´m one of the first people to put tissue in my ear at concerts, but I didn’t find it loud at all. On the contrary, I couldn´t understand some of the announcements.

 

Irish Fan Danny playing drums on YouTube

 

The concert was brilliant. I love the band’s first 2 albums “Hot Fuzss” and ´”Sam´s” town. Some of their later stuff is still good, but I feel they got a bit too electronic and poppy for my taste in the last years. Live however, even their newer songs I don ´t know that well sounded great. They played more guitar and drumm riffs. Brandon Flowers´ voice is very distinctive and he is a fantastic live-performer who gets the crowd to sing along. People loved when he called a fan holding a poster saying he is a drummer up on stage to perform with the band. He was brilliant, whether the  part was pre-arranged or not.

 

We were delighted that they played many of our old favourites like „Somebody told me“ „Jenny was a friend of mine“, „Smile like you mean it“ and of course „Mr. Brightside“. It was a great experience to sing along with the rest of the crowd. It got a bit messy towards the end and especially when people were leaving. We didn’t buy the totally overpriced drinks, but by the end of the evening  my clothes were sticky with spilled drink. People were generally polite enough. One girl though had an umbrella hat and one of the spikes got entangled in my hair. That  was dangerous and I´m surprised  security let her in with that.

 

“When You Where Young” The Killers live at the RDS Dublin on YouTube

When leaving everyone got stuck in a bottle neck and I had to hold on to my boyfriend otherwise I would have been rushed along. It was much harder to find a staff member on the way out. We followed the crowd, not exactly sure which gate to go to. When we got to the gate and asked security staff for directions to the DART a guy came out of the crowd and said he was going there too and we could go with him. Turns out he works at one of my boyfriend´s previous workplaces and recognised him. Without help we would probably have missed the last train. Only in Ireland you meet someone you know at a concert with  20,000 people.

 

Fazit

Overall, we had a great time and whenever it got tricky we got help from staff members or other people. I generally find the security people at concert venues extremely helpful. But of course there will be crowds and some pushing at every concert. If you are worried about that you could try to contact the venue and ask if you can stand in the wheelchair accessible area, which is often less crowded. I have heard that some ticket providers give free tickets if you bring assistance, but I have never tried that. Here is a great article by Holly over at her blog Life of a Blind Girl on how to make concert venues more accessible for blind and visually impaired people.

 

I would definitely recommend going to  The Killers concert.

 

Has anyone else been there and what are your experiences with the accessibility of concert venues? Please feel free to leave a comment.

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white High speed train leaving a station

Interrailing in Germany – Part 1: Tips for Travellers with Vision Impairments

Since I started working in Ireland, I use most of my holidays to go back to Germany for Christmas, celebrations or simply to have a proper summer. I love catching up with family and friends, but at the same time I also want to travel to new places.

This May my boyfriend and I combined attending a birthday party with sightseeing in Germany. Before this trip I had seen more of Ireland than of Germany. Most people don’t  travel their own country and Germany is a large country, so there were plenty of cities I hadn´t  been to. During this trip we visited Frankfurt, Heidelberg, Stuttgart, Munich, Augsburg, Leipzig and Gera, my home town in Thuringia. Visiting Germany as a tourist gave me a different perspective on some aspects of German culture.

Map of Germany showing the main cities

 

How Accessible is Germany for someone with a vision impairment?

It really depends on where you go and what you want to do.  German public places and tourist attractions provide reasonable levels of accessibility. It is rarely perfect but manageable. In most cities you will get along with English, although speaking German definitely helps especially when asking for directions or reading information on websites and listening to announcements on public transport.

I googled the museums we wanted to visit to find outif they had audio guides or special tours. If not we joined “normal” tours in English. Some museums said they would provide us with a “special” tour if we paid extra for the guide. That is fair enough if you are a group and can split the cost, but I argued that we we should have the same access to the museum as a sighted visitor and that people with disabilities can’t always be expected to turn up in a group. In every case I got a tour for free or to a reduced price. In return I promised to write reviews about our visits. They will follow later in this series.

 

Using Public Transport

 

You can get everywhere by public transport. Most cities have at least busses and trams, the major ones offer also subways or undergrounds. These well connected transport systems make it easy to get around, but it can be challenging to find the right platform in a station that looks like a gigantic shopping centre.

I still have a German travel pass, which means I and an “assistant” can go for free on regional trains and local public transport. For the fast trains (ICE and EC) I only get the assistant’s ticket for free. I bought our tickets for the longer journeys online through the DB Navigator App (Deutsche Bahn App) a few weeks in advance and never paid more than €30 per journey. However, these reduced tickets are bound to a specific departure time. I think the “assistance” is supposed to be sighted, but we always got away with it.

You can book assistance at the train stations to show you to the plattform and to meet you off the train to bring you to the exit. However, the service has to be booked through the Mobilitätzentrale (Mobility centre) at least 24 hours in advance. If you don´t speak German it would be easiest to send them an email at MSZ@deutschebahn.com with your contact information, travel details, what kind of assistance you need and if you travel with luggage and use a cane or guide dog. Bring the cane even if you don ´t use it, so  the assistance can recognise you. If you have some vision look out for someone with a bright red hat, shaped like a police uniform cap.

If you have an ICE or EC ticket the mobility centre also bookes you a seat reservation free of charge. That also makes it easier for them to find you on the train and you don´t  have to wander around looking for a non-reserved seat.

Overall the assistance works very well, the only disadvantage is that it can´t be used spontaneously. If we were  not bound to a certain departure time and the train was frequent enough, we turned up early and found the plattform ourselves. Ironically, the meeting points for the assistance are sometimes harder to find than a plattform.

Private Busses

There are also several private bus companies like FlixBus. These busses connect the major cities and even have destinations allover Europe. They are cheaper than the trains and the App is easy to use and the tickets are digital so I don‘t have to worry about paperwork I can’t read. There are no free tickets for travel pass owners, but on request  the bus companies often give a free ticket for the „assistance“. Contact customer service and give it a go.

green flixbus coach

My golden rule is: Always ask for reductions for people with disabilities, especially in tourist attraction. Public transport companies are not required to accept foreign travel passes. But you can always try, especially if you have a kane. Train conductors have to sell you a ticket at normal price without charging an extra fee for buying on board, because the ticket machines have touch screens. The larger stations also have a „Reisetenzrum“ travel centre with a ticket counter.

 

Planning is Key

This sounds stereotypical German, but I really believe that I get more out of a holiday, If I take the time to do some research.  Where do I want to go? What is there to see and how do I get there. Without planning I would waist valuable time finding out all this information when I get there.

Booking Hotels

I’m a big fan of apps. I find that booking.com and Tripadvisor for IOS are more accessible and less cluttered than their website versions. The IPhone speech software VoiceOver reads most text fields and buttons on the screen. I save all my travel documents to ICloud files and make them available offline to access them even without internet.

Listen to other people’s reviews on Booking.com. I booked a hotel with a 2 star rating in Frankfurt and regretted it. More about that in a future post on Frankfurt.  Read the property descriptions carefully. How far is it away from the hotel away from the centre, are there restaurants and shops nearby, how good is the transport connection. You can also look at the property in Google Maps, which leads me to the next point.

Google Maps Lists

For this holiday, I created a private Google maps list with places to go in each city we visited. These included not only tourist attractions, but also restaurants, pubs Cafés and parks.  Food-wise I want local cuisine and healthy and cheap options, which mostly turn out to be Chinese or Indian.  Read the reviews, sometimes they even tell you what is near the location. Use the public transport options in Google Maps for directions and select your hotel or a major train station or square as starting point.  Also have a look for a local public transport App in the App Store. Some cities even produce a visually impaired friendly version of their app. Don t hesitate to add more places than you will probably visit to your Google Maps list. You will find that some things are near each other and it is good to have a choice.

Screen shot of Google Maps list Munich
part of my Google Maps list

Overall, I would definitely recommend Germany as a travel destination. All the preparation sounds like a lot of work, but it will ultimately make the holiday more enjoyable and a bit more stress free.

What experiences do you have travelling to Germany? Or are you planning a trip to Germany and have any questions? Feel free to ask them in the comments.

Accessible Guided Tour of Dublin Zoo

a group of elephants standing on stone steps leading into water

My last visit in Dublin Zoo was over a year ago. I wrote a German article at the time, however we were so impressed with the visitor service, that I wanted to write an English version – so here it is, cute animal pictures included.

I had wanted to visit the zoo for a while, but we thought it would be difficult for two people with vision impairments to navigate the grounds without sighted help, since we are unable to read signposts or maps. So we called a day in advance and asked if someone would show us arround. The lady at the visitor centre said one of their volunteers would be delighted to give us a guided tour of the zoo.

The friendliness of Irish people towards strangers fascinates me. Our guide Catherine was lovely. The guided tour was more like a stroll around the zoo with a friend. We had interesting conversations and some great laughs. All volunteers are trained and have an impressive knowledge of the zoo, including historical facts and information about the different species it houses. It was great to be shown the zoo by someone who is passionate about their work.

Dublin Zoo offers a number of facilities to make its grounds accessible to everyone. Apart from the guided tours they have wheelchair, accessible toiletes, facilities for minding service dogs and a number of tactile objects with braille. We could touch an elephant skull with tusks, a set of giraffe teeth and a tiger fur. It was helpful to feel the different structures and to get a better impression of the shapes of the animals.

The best part of our visit was watching the feeding of the elephants during which even the baby elephants came close to the water. The carer told us how much and what they eat. Some fun facts: The elephants are trained to lift their feed to get their nails cut; And as part of  the regular health checks their poo needs to be tested. In order to determine which gigantic pile belongs to what elephant they are each fed a bit of differently coloured tinsel.  Well, at least the carers can see the bright side of an otherwise not pleasant-sounding task.

Some animals like reptiles or birds can be hard to see for people with vision impairments. I brought a magnification tool, which I normally use to look at traffic lights and bus numbers. Another trick is to zoom in with the phone camera or to take a picture and zoom in afterwards to focus on an animal.

The landscape the animals live in resembles their natural environment. Especially impressive is the ape area consisting of numerous islands. The penguins with their black and white colour contrast were also easy to sse. We could even watch them swimming under water through a glass wall. It was similar with the giraffes and zebras in their savanna.

More fun facts> Catherine told us about a scientist who uses video footage to study how long each of the flamingos stands on the same leg. I would love to know the answer for my fun facts collection.

a group of pink flamingos

In many ways it is difficult for people with disabilities to live independently in Ireland (public transport is my favourite example). However, what makes it a lot easier is the willingness of many people to give extra time and effort to other people´s special requirements. In contrast, in Germany many employees only do what is required of them according to their job description. Volunteering is not as as large a part of German culture as it is in Ireland. There are special guided tours, but often only if you bring a goup, pay extra for it or arrange it months in advance. In Ireland we were always accommodated without lengthy arrangements.

Monkey climbing along ropes

Unfortunately, we could not find skunks, my favourite animals. I suspect it is because of the smell. Dublin Zoo is always worth a visit. Nature is fascinating and without institutions promoting the continuation and procreation of endangered animals a significant number of animals would have died out by now.

Photography Workshop for People with Visual Impairments in Dublin

I’m really excited to promote this fantastic project in Ireland. I participated in some of the workshops in Berlin. It was great and I was positively surprised of the quality of some of the pictures we took.

Photo Narrations

a black and white photograph of a woman with dark glasses and head holding a camera. Two younger women help her to take the picture.

What: Free 2 day digital photography and light painting workshop

When: Saturday 8th July, Sunday 9th July.

Who is it for: participants with visual impairments interested in trying out photography and sighted volunteers, no experience required

Where? NCBI Head Office, Whitworth Rd. Dublin 9.

How to register? Email picdesc@gmail.com for further questions and to register.

What to bring: enthusiasm for trying out something new, smart phone or digital camera and props e.g. scarf’s, hats, costumes and LED flash lights, if available

Run by: Karsten Hein (organises photography workshops for visually impaired people in Berlin)

Outcome: exhibition of photographs with accompanying texts, Permanent online exhibition and article at www.photonarrations.wordpress.com

The idea:

 The photography workshop challenges the prevailing misconception, that blind people have no understanding of and interest in visual arts. People with physical disabilities tend to be in pictures, rather than taking them. This project aims to turn…

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Studentische Auslandsmobilität Erhöhen – Diskutiere mit

Der DAAD (Deutscher Akademischer Austauschdienst) organisiert im Rahmen seiner Kampagne „studieren weltweit – erlebe es!“ am 19. und 20. Juni in Essen eine Tagung mit vorangehender Online-Diskussion unter dem Titel „„Studentische Auslandsmobilität erhöhen! – Soziale Diversität und Lehramt als Herausforderung und Chance“, die vier Gruppen in den Fokus nehmen möchte:

All diese Gruppen sind – aus verschiedenen Gründen – statistisch bei Auslandsaufenthalten unterrepräsentiert. Im Rahmen des Austausches und der Diskussion geht es um die Identifikation von Hürden und mögliche Verbesserungspotentiale im Sinne der jeweiligen Zielgruppen.

Ich bin studentische Themenpatin für den Bereich Auslandsaufenthalt mit Beeinträchtigung oder chronischer Erkrankung und lade euch hiermit herzlich ein, euch noch bis zum 19. May an der Online Diskussion zu beteiligen. Hier ist mein Video in dem ich erzähle, warum sich für mich als Studentin mit Seheinschränkung Mein Auslandssstudium in Galway akademisch und persönlich gelohnt hat.

Diskutiere Mit!

Im Bereich Auslandsaufenthalt mit Beeinträchtigung oder chronischer Erkrankung findet ihr Thesen und Umfragen rund um die Themen Planung, Finanzierung und Durchführung von Auslandsstudien und Praktika, zu denen ihr kommentieren und abstimmen könnt. Die Ergebnisse werden in der Tagung im Juni ausgewertet und diskutiert.

Im Abschnitt Deine Geschichte könnt ihr von euren eigenen Auslandserfahrungen berichten und Tipps teilen, um andere Studierende zu ermutigen diese Chance zu nutzen.

Folgt Studieren Weltweit auch auf Facebook, Twitter und Instagram

 

Clothes Shopping with a Personal Shopper

I’m not exactly a fashion enthusiast. I obviously want to look well and feel good about myself, but easy maintenance and practicality always come before style. When I moved to Ireland, I could no longer bring my mum a bag full of ironing every weekend. She gave me a precise list specifying which items could be washed together and at what temperature they had to be ironed and suddenly I was on my own. I gave up the good intentions of separating and ironing my laundry in the second week, colour absorbing tissues had to do the job and all the blouses and skirts, which definitely had to be ironed where banished back into the suitcase. Jeans, T-shirts and jumpers became my best friends.

I don’t believe in New Year’s resolutions, but I wanted to bring a bit of variety and colour into my wardrobe this season. Shopping in general, whether it’s for food, household stuff or clothes, does not rank high on my list of favourite activities. I can think of tonnes of things that are more fun than wondering aimlessly around a gigantic shopping centre, full of stressed people hunting for the latest bargains.

 

I n a leather skirt, black tights and a dark top with flower patterns.

Being visually impaired doesn’t make it easier. I have to take every item out of the shelf and hold it really close to my face or even use a magnifier to see what it is. Apart from people staring at me, this is very slow and frustrating. Initially, I was ashamed to ask for help and bought whatever I could identify. I ended up with rather random stuff in my trolley and if I was really unlucky I got meat pizza instead of the vegetarian version. After a while, I overcame my pride somewhat and now I get the shop assistants to help me. Most of them are very friendly, but in places like ALDI it can be hard to find someone. More upmarket places like Tesco do home delivery.

I enjoy clothes shopping with my mum. We are having great fun laughing about some of the more ridiculous fashion trends and I know she is honest when something doesn’t suit me, sometimes even too honest. But my mum is also the conventional Jeans-type, so I ended up buying similar clothes twice a year when I was home in Germany.

I have seen personal shoppers on TV, transforming slightly uncomfortable looking participants into completely new people with the help of high-maintenance haircuts, lots of make-up and pretty clothes nobody would wear in everyday life. But my boyfriend had used it before and was very happy with the service and encouraged me to give it a go. In fact, he made the appointment in the biggest New Look store in Dublin, otherwise I would probably still be talking about doing it soon.

I was very nervous and self-conscious in the beginning. I showed the lady who helped me some pictures of clothes I liked from the New Look website and half expected her to shake her head in despair saying these styles don’t suit me. Of course she didn’t. I managed to say that I want to wear something more adventurous and elegant than jeans and off we went through the fashion labyrinth. I took whatever she suggested. No harm in trying I thought. While I liked some pieces at first sight, I would have never even thought of trying a leather skirt for example. Surprisingly, it looked really good and I bought it. It’s one of my favourite skirts now and it doesn’t have to be ironed.

I had a whole changing area to myself and actually really enjoyed this shopping trip. We had a great chat about what colours and styles go together and it almost felt like a shopping trip with a friend. I realised that I had been too hard on myself when it comes to what goes with what. I’m a perfectionist, but as my granny says: “Nowadays almost everything goes together”. The challenge with skirts and dresses is to find matching shoes I can walk in, but we managed to find a pair with relatively small heels and like everything else it’s all about practice.

Since I don’t want to go shopping anytime again soon, I bought lots of stuff. That way you can make sure every top goes with every skirt, instead of buying single pieces, only to discover that you have nothing to go with it once you get home. I would definitely recommend availing of personal shoppers for everyone, visually impaired or not. It’s fun, efficient and full of surprises. A new style can make a huge difference and I got only positive feedback from my friends. The shop assistance are passionate about fashion and helping customers is a welcome break from stocking shelves or standing at the till to them. I’ll definitely be back in the winter season.

Lit buildings along the spree at night

Irish Society from a German Perspective

As a German student living in Ireland for the best part of three years, it took me a while to realize that my Erasmus year at NUI Galway not only made me a more independent and open-minded person; gradually it also improved my perception of my home country. While visiting Berlin with my Irish boyfriend, it dawned on me that living standards and social security are definitely higher in Germany.
When I applied for the exchange year as an undergrad, I couldn’t get away quick enough. I was fed up with the infamous German bureaucracy, the anonymity of big cities and everyone’s stereotypical “Germanness”- first and foremost my own. I took my conveniently located and affordable apartment, my student grant and free third level education for granted, and became unsatisfied and restless. Although I met plenty of foreign and Irish students who had to pay for college and their stay abroad, I still didn’t understand people’s enthusiasm for everything German. I spoke as little German as possible and when I started to speak with an Irish accent, I began pretending to be Irish when abroad, and asked my friends to stop introducing me as “Tina from Germany”, a fact they think I should be proud of. My Irish friends are still puzzled by my lack of interest in German history and current affairs and wonder why I don’t talk to every German tourist on the street. They mention people they know in Munich and are almost disappointed that I don’t know them. It seems to make no difference that I’m from the opposite side of the country.
 TV tower in front of blue sky
 

Initially, I had mixed feelings about bringing my boyfriend to Berlin. I don’t know the city well and I was afraid to fail miserably as a tour guide. However, researching things to do, I discovered lots of interesting sights I haven’t been to myself. I really enjoyed the city centre walk and the bus tour in English, maybe because they were designed for foreigners and gave a good overview without going into too much detail. My generation was no longer taught to feel responsible for the past in school, we were nevertheless bombarded with dates and facts, which we forgot as soon as the last exam was over. Most Irish people on the other hand have a fair idea of Irish history and politics.
The best part of the trip was a Trabi Safari. Trabis are flimsy looking, but surprisingly robust cars produced in the GDR. Although I was born after the wall came down, I feel nostalgic every time I see one of these cult-cars. Before my boyfriend remarked on it, I hadn’t noticed that the buildings in East Berlin are much more square looking than those in the Western part of the city. There are still architectural, economic and cultural differences between East and West. When telling people I’m from Germany, I always make the point that I’m east German, a distinction the Irish, many of whom are proud of their home county, tend to understand better than other visitors.
 lit TV tower at night
My boyfriend loved the cheap but high-quality multi-cultural restaurants and the variety of cakes and rolls in bakery shops. He was seriously impressed with the frequency and punctuality of all modes of public transport. In most parts of the country, but especially in the capital, you can get everywhere by train, bus and subway, and changing from one to the other is no problem. The transport systems in Galway and even Dublin do not remotely compare to that. The massive train stations are a bit overwhelming at first, but as someone who doesn’t drive, I felt very empowered.
 Wall with street art
For me, Germany’s main advantage is the high level of social security. Unemployed people are far from being rich, but in my opinion nobody who seeks help has to be homeless there. It took me years to understand Irish people’s obsession with owning a house; unlike in Germany, well-kept apartments in Ireland are rare. The Irish rental market is privatised and on top of paying ridiculous rents, tenants have few rights. At home, neither my parents nor my grandparents own a house; they live in the same apartments for years and don’t intend to buy it. This system makes it easier for people to move and although the minimum wage in Germany is slightly lower than in Ireland, people don’t have to spent most of their money on paying a mortgage. As a student, my health insurance contribution is comparatively low and most medical treatments and prescription medications, including a GP visit in Ireland, are free.
 High rise building
My main reasons for living in Ireland are still the stunning landscape, Irish arts and first and foremost the friendliness of the people. By now I have more good friends here than I ever had in Germany. Nevertheless, most people we met on our holiday were very nice and spoke at least some English. Unlike the small East-German town I’m from, Berlin is pretty international and one can get around without speaking much German.
Ireland is a great country to live in, as long as you have a well-paid job and don’t get seriously ill. If the government wants to keep young people in the country, it has to offer us a future that makes working, living and perhaps raising a family here more attractive. Otherwise, many of us will eventually move to countries with better living-standards, even if we don’t really want to.
First published on campus.ie

Blogprojekt: Studieren Weltweit – Studium in Irland

 

Auch wenn es auf diesem Blog im Moment eher ruhig ist, schreibe ich auf Studieren Weltweit weiter fleißig über meine Zeit in Galway an der Irischen Westküste. Hier eine Übersicht einiger Artikel zu den Themen Planung und Finanzierung von ERASMUS-Jahr und Auslandsstudium sowie meinem Studienalltag mit Sehbehinderung. Für Fotos könnt ihr mir zusätzlich auf Instagram folgen.

Finanzierung eines Erasmus+ Studiums mit Behinderung

Im Post „Wohin als Studierende mit Behinderung?“ habe ich die wichtigsten Anlaufstellen für die Planung meines Erasmus+ Jahres an der National University of Ireland Galway genannt. Ich habe viel Verständnis und Hilfe von meinem Erasmus+ Koordinator, dem Akademischen Auslandsamt und dem International Office bekommen. Alle Mitarbeitenden haben mich in meiner Entscheidung ins Ausland zu gehen bestärkt.

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Ein Königreich für ein Bett – Wohnen in Galway

Nachdem Finanzierung und Kursauswahl für den ERASMUS+– Aufenthalt in Irland geregelt waren, galt es ein Zimmer in Galway zu finden. Ich bin kein Fan von WGs, aber nachdem ich mir einige irische Webseiten zur Wohnungssuche  angesehen hatte, wurde mir klar, dass eine eigene Einraumwohnung ein Wunschtraum bleiben würde.

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Ich packe meinen Koffer: Irland Essentials

Mir wurde erst richtig bewusst, dass mein ERASMUS+-Jahr jetzt startet, als ich wenige Tage vor Abflug nach Galway anfing meinen Koffer zu packen. Hier ein paar nützliche Hinweise fürs Kofferpacken im Allgemeinen und ein paar Dinge die auf einer Irlandreise nicht fehlen dürfen.

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Studentenjobs im Ausland – Telefonauskunft

Viele Studierende arbeiten irgendwann im Laufe ihres Studiums im Kundensupport am Telefon. Im Ausland auf Englisch mit wildfremden Menschen zu telefonieren, von denen einige einen starken irischen Akzent haben oder selbst Ausländer sind, ist allerdings noch eine Stufe anspruchsvoller.

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Studieren mit Sehbehinderung

In diesem Post möchte ich kurz erklären, wie blinde und sehbehinderte Studierende arbeiten. In den letzten Jahren hat sich die Technik auf diesem Gebiet stark weiterentwickelt und das Internet erleichtert uns vieles. Trotzdem ist es immer noch schwierig an barrierefreie Fachliteratur zu kommen.

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Blogprojekt: Studieren Weltweit

Ab sofort schreibe ich für den Blog Studieren Weltweit über mein ERASMUS-Jahr und mein Auslandsstudium in Galway. Meinen ersten Blogbeitrag „Blind im Ausland Studieren – Geht das?“ findet ihr hier. Unter dem Hashtag #ErlebeEs könnt ihr mir und den anderen Korrespondenten außerdem auf Facebook, Twitter und Instagram folgen.

 

Review: „The Wake“ by Tom Murphy with Audio Description at The Abbey Theatre

Photo Narrations

A few weeks ago we travelled to Dublin to see the latest production by the Abbey Theatreof Tom Murphy’s “The Wake”, a play portraying the materialism of Irish small-town communities in the early 1990s. It reveals how far most members of so called respectable families are prepared to go to satisfy their desire for power and wealth.

Accessible Performances

So far 2016 was a great year for fans of audio described theatre performances and I hope the continuing international interest in Irish arts will further not only creative art production, but also help to increase the availability of caption and audio description for patrons with visual and hearing impairments. I have written about how audio description works and the importance of making culture and arts accessible to everyone in a previous review.

The staff of the Abbey Theatre is very friendly and the lady who hands out…

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